DIFFERENCES BETWEEN A GYUTO KNIFE AND A SANTOKU KNIFE? - HandCraft Damascus Art
Japanese kitchen knives are highly revered because they always remain above the rest among the kitchen cutlery. They are just not the best in terms of the craftsmanship and efficacy but they also mark their distinction in terms of designs and uses. The well manufactured Japanese kitchen knives are unique and display impeccable artisanal craftsmanship.
As a professional chef, you must have come across various knives having the names sujihiki, nakiri, santuko, gyuto, deba, bunka, and kiritsuke. All these Japanese kitchen knives have been forged for centuries to the extent that you may find a Japanese kitchen knife for every kitchen task ranging from the all-rounders to uniquely characterized for cutting meat, fish or vegetables.
The Japanese all-rounders are typical traditional western-style kitchen knives. Gyuto and Santoku kitchen knives are two of the best Japanese all-rounders. These two are best-known multipurpose kitchen knives while sharing lots of similarities. However, there are some distinct differences that exist between them. Being multi-purpose kitchen knives, they are uniquely versatile while performing various tasks in the kitchen.
Gyuto Kitchen Knife
Pronounced as Gyūtō Bōchō in Japanese, the double-bevel Gyuto kitchen knife resembles much like the classic western-style kitchen knives. The only dissimilarity is that it has a tall heel and it is thinner. This multipurpose and versatile kitchen knife is useful in preparing numerous recipes with varying cutting styles. You can practically use it on most of the ingredients in the kitchen including vegetables, meats, fish, fruits and herbs.
In addition to their tall heels, they carry a slight curve from the midsection of the blade towards the tip. This design makes them suitable for pull-cutting, rock-chopping, push-cutting, and tap-chopping actions. Their pointed tips are meant for delicate and precision cuts. The blade lengths of the Gyuto knives vary from 180mm to 300mm. They remain undoubtedly the most versatile multipurpose Japanese kitchen knives.
What is the Santoku Kitchen Knife?
In Japanese language, this knife is pronounced as Santoku Bōchō. Santoku translates into ‘tree virtues’, a reference used for the knife’s adaptability in offering numerous cutting services like slicing, chopping, and dicing fish, meat and vegetables. Being a multipurpose kitchen knife, it keeps on serving with relatively shorter blade lengths varying from 130mm to 200mm. Like the Gyotu, the Santoku knife is used with most recipes. But unlike the Gyotu, it has a straight edge with a blunt sheep’s foot blade profile.

Similarities between the Gyuto Knife and the Santoku Knife
Versatility
Both the knives are highly versatile and multipurpose kitchen knives. They can perform any task be it chopping, dicing, chopping or slicing of fish, vegetables, or meat.
Blade’s Shape
Santoku and Gyuto kitchen knives have a long tall heel that gets narrowed towards the tip. However, while the Gyuto kitchen knife looks very similar to the traditional western-style kitchen knife because of its long and gracile taper towards the sharp tip. The Santoku knives integrate a sheep’s foot blade profile which suddenly twists from the spine towards the rounded tip. The edges of flat heel-sides of both the knives differ slightly.
Material
Both the knives are made of somewhat similar materials such as carbon steels and stainless steels. Their plastic or natural woods handles are either Japanese style or western-style.
Differences between the Gyuto Knife and the Santoku Knife
Bevel
Unlike the double-bevel of Gyuto knives, Santoku kitchen knives are single-bevel knives. The double-bevel Santoku knives are gaining popularity in the west and are more common. With their single bevel, the Santoku offers an ease to the chefs to make very clean cuts on the food while preserving its flavor, freshness, and texture. The asymmetric grind of the Santoku knife offers a ‘handedness’ in its usage. Depending on their bevel, some Santoku favour left-handed users while others favour right-handed users. The double-bevel Gyuto does not offer such flexibility
Blade’s Length
Santoku knives have larger blades although they are relatively shorter than the Gyuto which resemble much like the longer western-style chef’s knives. Typical blade lengths for Gyuto knives vary from 180mm to 300mm, whereas Santoku’s blades range from 130mm to 200mm.
Blade’s Tip
The sharp and pointed tip of Gyuto kitchen knives easily pierces food for precision cutting or slicing. The tips of Santoku knives’s blades are quite blunt and slightly rounded and, as such, not suitable for piercing food.
Edges
The Santoku kitchen knives have a straight edge unlike the Gyuto kitchen knives that are flat at the heel but their edge has a slight curve starting from the midsection towards the tip. These varying edges do impact the scope of use of these two-multi-use knives.
Gyuto can easily be used for rock-cutting, rock-chopping, pull-cutting, push-cutting and tap-chopping due to its curved edge. Santoku is less favourable for any back and forth rocking uses. However, Santoku kitchen knives are perfect choice for making swift clean cuts due to their straight edge. In addition, the Santoku kitchen knife is also an ideal choice for tap-chopping and push-cutting purposes.

Japanese kitchen knives are highly revered because they always remain above the rest among the kitchen cutlery. They are just not the best in terms of the craftsmanship and efficacy but they also mark their distinction in terms of designs and uses. The well manufactured Japanese kitchen knives are unique and display impeccable artisanal craftsmanship.
As a professional chef, you must have come across various knives having the names sujihiki, nakiri, santuko, gyuto, deba, bunka, and kiritsuke. All these Japanese kitchen knives have been forged for centuries to the extent that you may find a Japanese kitchen knife for every kitchen task ranging from the all-rounders to uniquely characterized for cutting meat, fish or vegetables.
The Japanese all-rounders are typical traditional western-style kitchen knives. Gyuto and Santoku kitchen knives are two of the best Japanese all-rounders. These two are best-known multipurpose kitchen knives while sharing lots of similarities. However, there are some distinct differences that exist between them. Being multi-purpose kitchen knives, they are uniquely versatile while performing various tasks in the kitchen.
Gyuto Kitchen Knife
Pronounced as Gyūtō Bōchō in Japanese, the double-bevel Gyuto kitchen knife resembles much like the classic western-style kitchen knives. The only dissimilarity is that it has a tall heel and it is thinner. This multipurpose and versatile kitchen knife is useful in preparing numerous recipes with varying cutting styles. You can practically use it on most of the ingredients in the kitchen including vegetables, meats, fish, fruits and herbs.
In addition to their tall heels, they carry a slight curve from the midsection of the blade towards the tip. This design makes them suitable for pull-cutting, rock-chopping, push-cutting, and tap-chopping actions. Their pointed tips are meant for delicate and precision cuts. The blade lengths of the Gyuto knives vary from 180mm to 300mm. They remain undoubtedly the most versatile multipurpose Japanese kitchen knives.
What is the Santoku Kitchen Knife?
In Japanese language, this knife is pronounced as Santoku Bōchō. Santoku translates into ‘tree virtues’, a reference used for the knife’s adaptability in offering numerous cutting services like slicing, chopping, and dicing fish, meat and vegetables. Being a multipurpose kitchen knife, it keeps on serving with relatively shorter blade lengths varying from 130mm to 200mm. Like the Gyotu, the Santoku knife is used with most recipes. But unlike the Gyotu, it has a straight edge with a blunt sheep’s foot blade profile.

Similarities between the Gyuto Knife and the Santoku Knife
Versatility
Both the knives are highly versatile and multipurpose kitchen knives. They can perform any task be it chopping, dicing, chopping or slicing of fish, vegetables, or meat.
Blade’s Shape
Santoku and Gyuto kitchen knives have a long tall heel that gets narrowed towards the tip. However, while the Gyuto kitchen knife looks very similar to the traditional western-style kitchen knife because of its long and gracile taper towards the sharp tip. The Santoku knives integrate a sheep’s foot blade profile which suddenly twists from the spine towards the rounded tip. The edges of flat heel-sides of both the knives differ slightly.
Material
Both the knives are made of somewhat similar materials such as carbon steels and stainless steels. Their plastic or natural woods handles are either Japanese style or western-style.
Differences between the Gyuto Knife and the Santoku Knife
Bevel
Unlike the double-bevel of Gyuto knives, Santoku kitchen knives are single-bevel knives. The double-bevel Santoku knives are gaining popularity in the west and are more common. With their single bevel, the Santoku offers an ease to the chefs to make very clean cuts on the food while preserving its flavor, freshness, and texture. The asymmetric grind of the Santoku knife offers a ‘handedness’ in its usage. Depending on their bevel, some Santoku favour left-handed users while others favour right-handed users. The double-bevel Gyuto does not offer such flexibility
Blade’s Length
Santoku knives have larger blades although they are relatively shorter than the Gyuto which resemble much like the longer western-style chef’s knives. Typical blade lengths for Gyuto knives vary from 180mm to 300mm, whereas Santoku’s blades range from 130mm to 200mm.
Blade’s Tip
The sharp and pointed tip of Gyuto kitchen knives easily pierces food for precision cutting or slicing. The tips of Santoku knives’s blades are quite blunt and slightly rounded and, as such, not suitable for piercing food.
Edges
The Santoku kitchen knives have a straight edge unlike the Gyuto kitchen knives that are flat at the heel but their edge has a slight curve starting from the midsection towards the tip. These varying edges do impact the scope of use of these two-multi-use knives.
Gyuto can easily be used for rock-cutting, rock-chopping, pull-cutting, push-cutting and tap-chopping due to its curved edge. Santoku is less favourable for any back and forth rocking uses. However, Santoku kitchen knives are perfect choice for making swift clean cuts due to their straight edge. In addition, the Santoku kitchen knife is also an ideal choice for tap-chopping and push-cutting purposes.

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