Knowing about Different Parts of Utility Chef Knives - HandCraft Damascus Art

A utility knife is the best kitchen tool to chop smaller vegetable and foods. Many of its features resemble to that of chef knives. But it is a highly useful gadget to perform the small jobs with precision and great comfort. This versatile knife for everyday tasks can neatly slice meats. Best utility knives contain a blade of length ranging from 4 to 7 inches. If you want to find the best-quality knife to perform a specific kitchen job, having a basic knowledge about the different parts of a utility knife can ease your job while looking to buy for it in the market.
The reader will observe that this blog simply contains an overview of the different features one might like to see in most utility knives.

Blade:

The blade is the name given to that part of the knife which is used to cut or chop food. The best utility knives contain blades typically crafted from steel. However, in some knives, other materials like ceramic and titanium are also used. 


Edge:

This is the most sharpened part of the blade that slices through the food and performs most of the cutting work. Any knife’s sharpness depends upon the quality of the edge – the finely the edge is ground, the better will be the quality of the utility knife. The quality of edge increases according to the way a user would sharp it. It could straight or serrated as in case of bread knives.


Spine:

It’s also important for providing balance to the overall knife. The spine is the top blunt part of the blade and is opposite to the cutting edge of the knife. The blade of the utility knife drives its strength from the thickness of the spine. As a rule, the more is the spine thicker, the stronger will be the knife’s blade.


Point:

The point is part of the knife where the spine and edge of the knife contact. You can say that it is the end of the knife’s blade. The point is usually sharpened to a fine tip and it can also be used to score or pierce the surface of food for detailed and delicate cutting.


Tip:

It is the front part of the knife’s edge. It lies just beneath the knife’s point and therefore called the tip. This part of the blade is typically used to cut and chop delicate foods. The chefs usually keep the tip sharpened when they want detailed or delicate cutting task.


Heel:

The heel is the rear part of the cutting edge of the blade. In other words, it lies lower the edge of the blade. Heel is furthest from the tip, but next to the bolster. In some cases, heel is often the widest part of the blade. When chefs require more pressure or strength to pierce through tougher foods or thicker parts of the meat, they most commonly prefer to use the heel of the blade.


Tang:

The tang is the unsharpened back portion of the blade and extends to connect the blade edge to the handle - one which runs from the end of the blade all the way to the butt. Role of the tang or shank is very important in the durability feature of the knife. It maintains the overall balance, stability, weight, and strength of the knife. Knives with a full tang are usually considered to be the best utility knives. In some designs, the tang also functions as a handle.


Handle or scales:

Handle is also sometimes called ‘scales’. The handle is that part of the knife which the chef grasps while cutting or chopping food. Handle can be made from a variety of materials. Its design could be simple, straight or it may be designed with finger grooves besides offering other ergonomic features due to which it becomes easier to hold the knife. Some knife manufacturers instead of making a knife using a single piece of steel, go for dispensing of the handle altogether. In that way, they are likely to use the tang to perform the function of a handle.


Bolster:

The bolster is the band that joins the handle of the knife to its blade. It appears as a raised area between the blade and the handle. The bolster puts a small space between the chef’s hand and the blade. Resultantly, it helps to avoid the fingers from slipping down onto the blade while performing cutting tasks. Bolster is responsible to add additional weight in order to help balance the knife.


Handle fasteners, or rivets:

These are the screws that fix the handle parts to the tang. Less expensive designs may not use the rivets and, instead, attach the handle to the tang using resin or epoxy instead.


Butt:

It is the name given to the end of the handle. It lies at the very bottom of the knife.

A utility knife is the best kitchen tool to chop smaller vegetable and foods. Many of its features resemble to that of chef knives. But it is a highly useful gadget to perform the small jobs with precision and great comfort. This versatile knife for everyday tasks can neatly slice meats. Best utility knives contain a blade of length ranging from 4 to 7 inches. If you want to find the best-quality knife to perform a specific kitchen job, having a basic knowledge about the different parts of a utility knife can ease your job while looking to buy for it in the market.
The reader will observe that this blog simply contains an overview of the different features one might like to see in most utility knives.

Blade:

The blade is the name given to that part of the knife which is used to cut or chop food. The best utility knives contain blades typically crafted from steel. However, in some knives, other materials like ceramic and titanium are also used. 


Edge:

This is the most sharpened part of the blade that slices through the food and performs most of the cutting work. Any knife’s sharpness depends upon the quality of the edge – the finely the edge is ground, the better will be the quality of the utility knife. The quality of edge increases according to the way a user would sharp it. It could straight or serrated as in case of bread knives.


Spine:

It’s also important for providing balance to the overall knife. The spine is the top blunt part of the blade and is opposite to the cutting edge of the knife. The blade of the utility knife drives its strength from the thickness of the spine. As a rule, the more is the spine thicker, the stronger will be the knife’s blade.


Point:

The point is part of the knife where the spine and edge of the knife contact. You can say that it is the end of the knife’s blade. The point is usually sharpened to a fine tip and it can also be used to score or pierce the surface of food for detailed and delicate cutting.


Tip:

It is the front part of the knife’s edge. It lies just beneath the knife’s point and therefore called the tip. This part of the blade is typically used to cut and chop delicate foods. The chefs usually keep the tip sharpened when they want detailed or delicate cutting task.


Heel:

The heel is the rear part of the cutting edge of the blade. In other words, it lies lower the edge of the blade. Heel is furthest from the tip, but next to the bolster. In some cases, heel is often the widest part of the blade. When chefs require more pressure or strength to pierce through tougher foods or thicker parts of the meat, they most commonly prefer to use the heel of the blade.


Tang:

The tang is the unsharpened back portion of the blade and extends to connect the blade edge to the handle - one which runs from the end of the blade all the way to the butt. Role of the tang or shank is very important in the durability feature of the knife. It maintains the overall balance, stability, weight, and strength of the knife. Knives with a full tang are usually considered to be the best utility knives. In some designs, the tang also functions as a handle.


Handle or scales:

Handle is also sometimes called ‘scales’. The handle is that part of the knife which the chef grasps while cutting or chopping food. Handle can be made from a variety of materials. Its design could be simple, straight or it may be designed with finger grooves besides offering other ergonomic features due to which it becomes easier to hold the knife. Some knife manufacturers instead of making a knife using a single piece of steel, go for dispensing of the handle altogether. In that way, they are likely to use the tang to perform the function of a handle.


Bolster:

The bolster is the band that joins the handle of the knife to its blade. It appears as a raised area between the blade and the handle. The bolster puts a small space between the chef’s hand and the blade. Resultantly, it helps to avoid the fingers from slipping down onto the blade while performing cutting tasks. Bolster is responsible to add additional weight in order to help balance the knife.


Handle fasteners, or rivets:

These are the screws that fix the handle parts to the tang. Less expensive designs may not use the rivets and, instead, attach the handle to the tang using resin or epoxy instead.


Butt:

It is the name given to the end of the handle. It lies at the very bottom of the knife.

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