Santoku Chef Knives vs Chefs Knives: Which is the Best for Food Prep? - HandCraft Damascus Art

Many professional chefs consider Santoku knives and chef’s knives as the ‘go-to’ knives because both types are versatile and perform a range of food prep tasks in the kitchen. Technically, Santoku chef knives are a type of chef’s knife too but they differ in style and shape as compared to conventional German and French style chef knives.

In this blog, we will know the difference between these two types of knives in terms of their performance and make; blade’s material, blade’s length, and its style, and handles.

 

Best Santoku Knives


These knives have also been given the name Santoku bocho knives that mean “three uses”. These knives have got their origins back to the traditional Japanese vegetable knife having a rectangular blade.

 

Features of Handmade Santoku Chef Knives


Typically, these knives are a favorite choice for mincing, dicing, and slicing because they feature a straight edge along with a narrow sheep’s foot blade. The traditional Eastern-style blades of some Santoku knives are sharpened on one side only. They allow the chef to gain more control over the direction of cutting.

Santoku knives’ thin and flexible blade along with sheep’s foot tip does not let them perform well with tougher jobs such as deboning meat. Moreover, their harder steel is prone to chipping. The same holds true for cutting through hard vegetables including butternut squash and turnips.

Most Santoku knives are a mixture of West meets East owing to the fact that the blade’s shape is curved with a flat cutting edge and its sharpening is 50/50 on both sides. As a result, these knives are easier to sharpen and maintained with the use of traditional steel or pull-through sharpener.

Due to their narrow blade and lightweight, the best Damascus Santoku knives are ideal for precision work. They can make thinner cuts. In every slicing that the blade makes, less food is pushed out of the way.

 

Chef’s Knives


The readers should know that chef’s knives are available in varying styles.

French or German Style Chef’s Knives


They are recognized with their curved edge that gives the blade a rocking motion when put to chop against aboard. Their long blade is incredibly capable to slice through meat effortlessly. Chef’s knives are perceived as universal kitchen tools used in a variety of food prep tasks. It’s important to learn that there are subtle alterations between French and German-style knives.

 

Features of French and German Style Chef’s Knives


French knives usually have a blandish shape at the heel of the blade that reaches towards the point gradually. The profile of a German-style edge favors more of a curved blade. The robust blades chef’s knives give them an edge over Santoku knives in terms of performance as they magnificently carve through meat, fish, fruit as well as vegetables. Many professionals and home chefs consider a chef’s knife as the best all-around knife for a wider range of food prep tasks.

 

Dominating Difference between the Best Santoku Knives and Chef’s Knives


The dominating variance between handmade Santoku knives and chef's knives is that when you really want thin cuts, then Santoku knives are a better option for precision cutting. On the contrary, the chef’s knives are less revered in achieving the same level of precision. Santoku knives also apply a different approach of slicing through the food through forwarding and backward motion. However, a standard chef's knife works in rocking back and forth motion for the same job.

 

Style and Performance


The major and most important aspect of a knife in the eyes of a chef is its style and performance. Style is the shape and design of the knife and performance is the knife’s sharpness while in use.

 

Blade’s Length


Santoku knives’ blades are shorter than chef’s knives. At about 6 inches long, these blades are more useful and provide better control to less experienced chefs. The length of an average chef’s knife blade is 8 inches but could be as long as 14 inches.

 

Blade’s Material


Although, majority of kitchen knife blades use stainless steel its type and finish varies from manufacturer to manufacturer. For example, the prominent Santoku range of knives uses highly refined corrosion-resistant V-Gold-10-series steel within a Damascus cladding. The V-Gold-10-series steel type is manufactured in Japan. This strong high carbon steel is corrosion resistant.

Western knives’ blades are softer but tougher. Their steel blades are thicker and need sharpening more frequently. The softness of the steel blade makes them less prone to chipping. The toughness of the blade gives a heavy feeling though which, as per personal preference, could be a good or bad feature of the knife.

 

Handle


The conventional handmade Santoku knives don’t usually feature a bolster as do the typical German or French handles do. A bolster is meant to protect users’ hands from slipping down the blade. It offers a better grip. However, both types of knives are generally made with a full tang to get a balanced feel.

 

Abstract: Which style of knife is best?


The brand of knife you want to choose will mainly depend on personal preferences, but below are the solid options to choose between the two.

Ultimately, the best knife is the one that suits best to your grip and cookery style. A Santoku knife would be the better choice if you wish to cook a menu heavy on fish, fruit, and vegetables, but with less meat.

A chef’s knife is best if you need a robust all-rounder blade to carve meat and cut small bones as well as fruit and vegetables.

However, if you’re spending much of your time in the kitchen to make a variety of dishes then it’s worth splashing out on both knives.

Many professional chefs consider Santoku knives and chef’s knives as the ‘go-to’ knives because both types are versatile and perform a range of food prep tasks in the kitchen. Technically, Santoku chef knives are a type of chef’s knife too but they differ in style and shape as compared to conventional German and French style chef knives.

In this blog, we will know the difference between these two types of knives in terms of their performance and make; blade’s material, blade’s length, and its style, and handles.

 

Best Santoku Knives


These knives have also been given the name Santoku bocho knives that mean “three uses”. These knives have got their origins back to the traditional Japanese vegetable knife having a rectangular blade.

 

Features of Handmade Santoku Chef Knives


Typically, these knives are a favorite choice for mincing, dicing, and slicing because they feature a straight edge along with a narrow sheep’s foot blade. The traditional Eastern-style blades of some Santoku knives are sharpened on one side only. They allow the chef to gain more control over the direction of cutting.

Santoku knives’ thin and flexible blade along with sheep’s foot tip does not let them perform well with tougher jobs such as deboning meat. Moreover, their harder steel is prone to chipping. The same holds true for cutting through hard vegetables including butternut squash and turnips.

Most Santoku knives are a mixture of West meets East owing to the fact that the blade’s shape is curved with a flat cutting edge and its sharpening is 50/50 on both sides. As a result, these knives are easier to sharpen and maintained with the use of traditional steel or pull-through sharpener.

Due to their narrow blade and lightweight, the best Damascus Santoku knives are ideal for precision work. They can make thinner cuts. In every slicing that the blade makes, less food is pushed out of the way.

 

Chef’s Knives


The readers should know that chef’s knives are available in varying styles.

French or German Style Chef’s Knives


They are recognized with their curved edge that gives the blade a rocking motion when put to chop against aboard. Their long blade is incredibly capable to slice through meat effortlessly. Chef’s knives are perceived as universal kitchen tools used in a variety of food prep tasks. It’s important to learn that there are subtle alterations between French and German-style knives.

 

Features of French and German Style Chef’s Knives


French knives usually have a blandish shape at the heel of the blade that reaches towards the point gradually. The profile of a German-style edge favors more of a curved blade. The robust blades chef’s knives give them an edge over Santoku knives in terms of performance as they magnificently carve through meat, fish, fruit as well as vegetables. Many professionals and home chefs consider a chef’s knife as the best all-around knife for a wider range of food prep tasks.

 

Dominating Difference between the Best Santoku Knives and Chef’s Knives


The dominating variance between handmade Santoku knives and chef's knives is that when you really want thin cuts, then Santoku knives are a better option for precision cutting. On the contrary, the chef’s knives are less revered in achieving the same level of precision. Santoku knives also apply a different approach of slicing through the food through forwarding and backward motion. However, a standard chef's knife works in rocking back and forth motion for the same job.

 

Style and Performance


The major and most important aspect of a knife in the eyes of a chef is its style and performance. Style is the shape and design of the knife and performance is the knife’s sharpness while in use.

 

Blade’s Length


Santoku knives’ blades are shorter than chef’s knives. At about 6 inches long, these blades are more useful and provide better control to less experienced chefs. The length of an average chef’s knife blade is 8 inches but could be as long as 14 inches.

 

Blade’s Material


Although, majority of kitchen knife blades use stainless steel its type and finish varies from manufacturer to manufacturer. For example, the prominent Santoku range of knives uses highly refined corrosion-resistant V-Gold-10-series steel within a Damascus cladding. The V-Gold-10-series steel type is manufactured in Japan. This strong high carbon steel is corrosion resistant.

Western knives’ blades are softer but tougher. Their steel blades are thicker and need sharpening more frequently. The softness of the steel blade makes them less prone to chipping. The toughness of the blade gives a heavy feeling though which, as per personal preference, could be a good or bad feature of the knife.

 

Handle


The conventional handmade Santoku knives don’t usually feature a bolster as do the typical German or French handles do. A bolster is meant to protect users’ hands from slipping down the blade. It offers a better grip. However, both types of knives are generally made with a full tang to get a balanced feel.

 

Abstract: Which style of knife is best?


The brand of knife you want to choose will mainly depend on personal preferences, but below are the solid options to choose between the two.

Ultimately, the best knife is the one that suits best to your grip and cookery style. A Santoku knife would be the better choice if you wish to cook a menu heavy on fish, fruit, and vegetables, but with less meat.

A chef’s knife is best if you need a robust all-rounder blade to carve meat and cut small bones as well as fruit and vegetables.

However, if you’re spending much of your time in the kitchen to make a variety of dishes then it’s worth splashing out on both knives.

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