Sharpen Your Home Cooking Skills with the Best Chef’s Knives - HandCraft Damascus Art

Knives are the indispensable multi-tool of the kitchen. You slice and dice your way through veggies and meats with best chef’s knives to sharpen your cooking skills.

A sharp knife is the cornerstone in making a great meal. A good chef would typically like a knife that features some of the best qualities like the level of comfort in holding its grip, the size of the blade and the material with which the knife is made. There are some other factors too that make a knife a perfect choice for the chefs. A basic knife would contain 6 to 8 inches blade. That knife is ubiquitous and almost versatile. The chef's knife conveniently dices soft and hard veggies, finely chops and slices meat, smashes garlic, chops herbs and nuts, and, in a pinch, it cuts smoothly through small bones without giving any hard time to the chef.

There's a wide range of Handmade Chef's Knives available including expensive specialty blades to dirt cheap. To help the readers understand them better, we observed chefs slicing and dicing with a variety of knives until we discovered a simple truth. A cheap $10 blade if sharpened once a week chops in a better way than a costlier but dull blade worth $200. One should know that knives need to be sharpened every time they are used to chop and slice. Some need it more. Much of the price difference in knives is due to the use of the quality of materials. The material tells well how would a knife’s blade would behave and hold its edge.

Users usually stick with 8-inch blades, the sweet spot for a typical chef's knife. A knife’s testing revolves around checking its peeling, dicing, cubing, filleting, chopping, slicing and rest of the other standard preparation works to chop meats and vegetables. Here are our best picks.

Allwin

You can’t beat the beautiful wooden handle of this professional-grade Damascus chef knife. The knife has a Damascus steel blade and a truly appealing style. However, the real wood handle definitely makes this knife stand out amongst others.

It’s a great quality knife for different uses in the kitchen. With an 8-inch Damascus chef knife, the taste of chopping, slicing and dicing increases. From tip to handle, the knife is 13 inches long so the chef has a good, long handle that isn’t overbearing and it is sleek in every way that matters. 

Victorinox Fibrox Pro Chef's Knife - Best Beginner's Knife

Victorinox's Fibrox Pro chef's knife is the best value of any knife although it doesn't have the same high-quality built as in case of its competitors, however, a good Fibrox Pro Chef’s knife can cost less than $40. It holds its edge well and has a nearly nonstick finish to it. Hardly anything sticks to the knife’s blade, not even fresh cilantro. The knife is an excellent choice for keeping while travelling and can serve the chefs for years.

Korin Togiharu Carbon Steel Gyuto - Great Carbon Steel Knife 

One who owns a Korin Carbon Steel knife would love to carry it for decades. It remains the best in its kind. Korin's house-brand knives are marvelously designed and made and are comparatively less costly. This knife sharpens to a razor edge and holds it edge for number of years, longer than other knives. Caring for carbon steel will help taking more work from the knife. If the user does not care for the blade, it will quickly turn into a ugly, rusty, knife anyone would hate to use. Just wipe down the knife after every use and particularly after dealing with highly acidic foods like lemons and tomatoes. On regularly wiping the knife, it will keep its shine and its carbon steel blade won’t rust at all. Chefs with smaller hands might want to work with 5 – 6 inches blade in Korin Petty knives.

Shun Classic 7-inch Santoku Knife - Best-Looking Knife

The Shun is a classic Japanese Damascus steel knife and used for various purposes. The indentations present above the cutting edge reduce friction when the chef uses the knife through food and prevents stuff from sticking to it while he chops. The Shun holds its edge well during any form of testing, but it is complicated to sharpen. A chef might need to use some high-quality stones to sharpen the blade, or hand it to some professional.

The Damascus steel coating gives a distinctive ripple pattern to the knife and has a reputation for being difficult to care for. However, Shun is no doubt a good quality knife and no more finicky than carbon steel knife. The knife is available in the market for less than $ 120 with a Ho handle (round) and that is made for right handers.

 

Knives are the indispensable multi-tool of the kitchen. You slice and dice your way through veggies and meats with best chef’s knives to sharpen your cooking skills.

A sharp knife is the cornerstone in making a great meal. A good chef would typically like a knife that features some of the best qualities like the level of comfort in holding its grip, the size of the blade and the material with which the knife is made. There are some other factors too that make a knife a perfect choice for the chefs. A basic knife would contain 6 to 8 inches blade. That knife is ubiquitous and almost versatile. The chef's knife conveniently dices soft and hard veggies, finely chops and slices meat, smashes garlic, chops herbs and nuts, and, in a pinch, it cuts smoothly through small bones without giving any hard time to the chef.

There's a wide range of Handmade Chef's Knives available including expensive specialty blades to dirt cheap. To help the readers understand them better, we observed chefs slicing and dicing with a variety of knives until we discovered a simple truth. A cheap $10 blade if sharpened once a week chops in a better way than a costlier but dull blade worth $200. One should know that knives need to be sharpened every time they are used to chop and slice. Some need it more. Much of the price difference in knives is due to the use of the quality of materials. The material tells well how would a knife’s blade would behave and hold its edge.

Users usually stick with 8-inch blades, the sweet spot for a typical chef's knife. A knife’s testing revolves around checking its peeling, dicing, cubing, filleting, chopping, slicing and rest of the other standard preparation works to chop meats and vegetables. Here are our best picks.

Allwin

You can’t beat the beautiful wooden handle of this professional-grade Damascus chef knife. The knife has a Damascus steel blade and a truly appealing style. However, the real wood handle definitely makes this knife stand out amongst others.

It’s a great quality knife for different uses in the kitchen. With an 8-inch Damascus chef knife, the taste of chopping, slicing and dicing increases. From tip to handle, the knife is 13 inches long so the chef has a good, long handle that isn’t overbearing and it is sleek in every way that matters. 

Victorinox Fibrox Pro Chef's Knife - Best Beginner's Knife

Victorinox's Fibrox Pro chef's knife is the best value of any knife although it doesn't have the same high-quality built as in case of its competitors, however, a good Fibrox Pro Chef’s knife can cost less than $40. It holds its edge well and has a nearly nonstick finish to it. Hardly anything sticks to the knife’s blade, not even fresh cilantro. The knife is an excellent choice for keeping while travelling and can serve the chefs for years.

Korin Togiharu Carbon Steel Gyuto - Great Carbon Steel Knife 

One who owns a Korin Carbon Steel knife would love to carry it for decades. It remains the best in its kind. Korin's house-brand knives are marvelously designed and made and are comparatively less costly. This knife sharpens to a razor edge and holds it edge for number of years, longer than other knives. Caring for carbon steel will help taking more work from the knife. If the user does not care for the blade, it will quickly turn into a ugly, rusty, knife anyone would hate to use. Just wipe down the knife after every use and particularly after dealing with highly acidic foods like lemons and tomatoes. On regularly wiping the knife, it will keep its shine and its carbon steel blade won’t rust at all. Chefs with smaller hands might want to work with 5 – 6 inches blade in Korin Petty knives.

Shun Classic 7-inch Santoku Knife - Best-Looking Knife

The Shun is a classic Japanese Damascus steel knife and used for various purposes. The indentations present above the cutting edge reduce friction when the chef uses the knife through food and prevents stuff from sticking to it while he chops. The Shun holds its edge well during any form of testing, but it is complicated to sharpen. A chef might need to use some high-quality stones to sharpen the blade, or hand it to some professional.

The Damascus steel coating gives a distinctive ripple pattern to the knife and has a reputation for being difficult to care for. However, Shun is no doubt a good quality knife and no more finicky than carbon steel knife. The knife is available in the market for less than $ 120 with a Ho handle (round) and that is made for right handers.

 

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